Qi is an often misunderstood concept in Chinese kung fu, not only by people in the MMA crowd, but just as often by those within the Chinese martial arts community. When I asked GM Sam Chin about qi in the martial arts once, told me once “No qi is dead man. That simple.” In other words he was telling me not to worry about it. Sort of like a force of nature, like gravity. It’s there, you can harmonize with it to your advantage, but it’s not something you can actively manipulate per se,so I had to drop a comment on this video with Tony Blauer.


Superstar student Rudy practicing in Jaycee park here in Tempe, AZ at sunset a few weeks ago.

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This video of “non-violent bull fighting” from Facebook blew me away. “Timing and spacing” is big topic in martial arts, as are athletic qualities like explosiveness, and these guys possess these qualities in spades. However, maybe the most important quality on display here is something GM Sam Chin talks about almost exclusively; the role of attention and awareness in martial arts, and the superiority of mindfulness over habit (or in this case instinct, which is just hard wired, animal habit). Clearly the bull is more physically powerful in every way than the bullfighters, but the bullfighters are able use the power of attention and harmonizing to neutralize the attacks of the bull.
GM Sam Chin likes to tell the story that played a role in the “birth” of Zhong Xin Dao and changed his understanding of the role of the mind in martial arts. The famous monk Ajhan Chah was at Chuang Yen monastery and he asked GM Chin “why do martial artists try to imitate animals like tigers and monkeys? The tiger has it’s claws, that is the tiger’s strength, the monkey has it’s natural strengths. What is the human beings strength? It is the mind.”
I think this video demonstrates that quite clearly.


This is a video of GM Sam Chin (my martial arts teacher) discussing maintaining the point of contact during his joint presentation with Roy Goldberg of Daito Ryu (a form of japanese jiu jitsu).


This week’s podcast recommendation is an episode of Barbell Shrugged. I really enjoyed this episode with a man they label “the world’s strongest bodybuilder”, Stan Efferding. It’s been a long time since I bothered with any bodybuilding, but there’s a lot of great “pro-tips” in the episode that I thought were really interesting on how to deal with food intolerences, and once again, the importance of sleep and recovery and of taking action on the big, important items.I actually listened to this one twice because there’s so many little gems.
This week's podcast recommendation from Inner Strength Gym in Tempe, AZ Helping you find YOUR inner power.

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